NHL

Fraser: A closer look at Martin Brodeur's goal

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Kerry Fraser
3/22/2013 2:01:13 PM
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Got a question on rule clarification, comments on rule enforcements or some memorable NHL stories? Kerry Fraser wants to answer your emails at cmonref@tsn.ca!

Hey Kerry,

Was watching the Devils-Canes game and saw Marty's "goal" that was credited to him
 
I was curious as to why the goal was counted as a power play goal. I know that the net was empty at the time of the goal but the Canes were the ones with the delayed penalty opportunity
 
I would have thought that it would be scored as an even strength goal or even a shorthanded goal before a power play one.  Why is this?

Thanks,
Kyan Benesh
 
----
 
As a huge Martin Brodeur and New Jersey Devils fan, I cheered (and laughed) when I saw him get credit for a goal in the first period of tonight's game against the Hurricanes.
 
But to be fair... should this goal have counted?  It was a delayed penalty situation against the Devils, and as soon as a Devil touched the puck, the whistle should have blown. The puck was directed at Marty and he "made a save" but clearly he was playing the puck into the corner - to me, that seems like he had control of the puck.
 
Your opinion?
Joey Lindstrom

Kyan and Joey:

The power play goal credited to Martin Brodeur at 3:54 of the first period was legal and fell within the boundaries of a few different rules. Let's examine the play one stride at a time.

- It was designated a power play goal because the Canes were on the penalty kill after Alexander Semin went off at 3:33 for cross-checking Peter Harold of the Devils. "Short-handed" means that the team must be below the numerical strength of its opponent on the ice at the time the goal was scored. (Rule 16.2) The Canes were a man short at the time of the goal.

- When a delayed penalty is being signaled by the referee, a save by the goalkeeper or deflection of the puck off any player of the offending team does not constitute change of possession. Rule 15.1 states that when the team to be penalized gains control of the puck, the referee will stop play and impose the penalty to the offending player. As Patrick Dwyer took the puck to the net he was hooked by Marek Zidlicky of the Devils. The referee immediately raised his arm as Dwyer shot the puck from close range at the crease. Martin Brodeur made a butterfly save and the rebound was directed to the corner as Dwyer's momentum carried him into the Devils goalkeeper. This save and rebound is not deemed gaining control of the puck by the Devils.
 
- A goal shall be scored if the puck is put into the goal in any way by a player of the defending side. The player of the attacking side who last touched the puck shall be credited with the goal but no assist shall be awarded. (Rule 78.4) Also of note is rule 78.5 (xi) during the delayed calling of a penalty, the offending team cannot score unless the non-offending team shoots the puck into their own goal. Jordan Staal gained possession of the puck following the Brodeur save and his attempted pass back to Tim Gleason missed the mark and travelled the length of the ice into the open net. As the last Devils player to touch the puck Martin Brodeur was credited with the goal.

Your questions have now been answered Kyan and Joey. I want to throw an added twist to this play since the location of the hook by Zidlicky on Dwyer was very close to being deemed a penalty shot. If the referee was going to assess a clear cut penalty shot and during the delayed call Jordan Staal shot the puck into his own net what would have taken place might surprise you.

- Only one goal can be awarded at any stoppage of play. (Rule 78.6) The penalty shot rule (rule 24.6) also confirms that only one goal can be scored or awarded at a single stoppage of play where two penalty shots are awarded to the same team at the same stoppage. If a goal was scored on the first penalty shot, the second shot would not be taken but the appropriate penalty would be assessed for the infraction committed.

If Patrick Dwyer was to be awarded a penalty shot on this play but during the delayed call Jordan Staal shot the puck into his own net Martin Brodeur would be credited with the goal. Instead of the penalty shot, which could no longer be awarded to Dwyer by virtue of the goal, a hooking minor would be assessed to Marek Zidlicky.  

Save the date this Sunday if you are in the New York area and can join the NHL Alumni players as they play host the to the NYPD Hockey Team at Madison Square Garden to benefit Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund. Game time is 12:00 Noon and hosted by The Stan Lee Foundation.  Please click on the links below to purchase tickets or make donations. I hope to see you there.

NHL Alumni Participants: Benoit Hogue, Pat Lafontaine, Bruce Driver, Dan Blackburn, Ken Daneyko, Ron Duguay, Jim Dowd, Pat Flatley, Darius Kasparaitis, Vladimir Malakhov, Grant Marshall, Eddie Mio, Brian Mullen, Krzysztof Oliwa, Michel Petit and Mick Vukota, coaching by Ron Greschner, Ed Hospodar and special appearance NFL great Boomer Esiason and others.
 
With the majority of the proceeds going toward the Mayor's Fund to Advance New York City - Hurricane Sandy Relief, we are striving for a large turnout so we can support the rebuilding efforts in those areas.
 
1) To buy tickets:

http://www.thegarden.com/events/2013/march/rivals-for-relief-2013.html

 
2) Link to: Twitter @TheSLFoundation and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/StanLeeFoundation

Martin Brodeur (Photo: Andy Marlin/NHLI via Getty Images)

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(Photo: Andy Marlin/NHLI via Getty Images)
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